Exercising with your Dog!

Exercise is best fit with a friend or exercise partner.  Well your dog can be just that!  A trip to the vet for your dog and a doctor’s checkup for you is recommended before starting an exercise program. Here are some tips on how to involve your dog in your exercise regime!

Walking

Brisk walking is an ideal exercise for human and hound. The benefits include a stronger heart, lower blood pressure, more energy, denser bones, and a lower risk of depression. In dogs, regular walks can also reduce common behavior problems.

Dancing

If long walks don’t entice you, try dancing with your dog. Also called musical freestyle, you choreograph a dance routine to upbeat music. You’ll have your pooch running between your legs and performing other tricks, while both of you get an aerobic workout. The benefits of dance include burning calories and developing greater stamina, better balance, lower blood pressure, and improved muscle tone and bone density.

Jogging

Not all dogs are built to jog. Greyhounds, for example, are pros at short-distance sprinting, but can become fatigued during long-distance runs. If you want to jog with your dog, choose a breed that is suited to distance-running, such as a Labrador. Wait until your pup is full grown and then gradually build up to a 30-minute excursion. This should include five minutes of warm-up, 20 minutes of jogging, and five minutes of cooldown. Remember that dogs can’t sweat, so avoid the hot times of the day and stop if your dog is lagging behind you.

Swimming

Swimming is an all-in-one workout that is especially beneficial for people or dogs with arthritis. Because it’s a low-impact sport, swimming is easy on the joints. But that doesn’t mean it’s a wimpy workout. Swimming works various muscle groups, improves endurance, and strengthens the heart and lungs. Not all dogs enjoy swimming, so start slowly. Use toys or treats for encouragement, and if your dog still resists, find another sport.

Frisbee

Frisbee offers a classic canine workout. You can play a relaxed game in your own yard or join a formal “Disc Dog” team. Participating in competitions may give you and your dog greater motivation to practice regularly.

Hiking

If your area offers hiking opportunities, you’ve got one lucky dog. Like walking, you’ll need to maintain a brisk enough pace to elevate your heart rate. And if you live in an area where ticks carry Lyme disease, make sure you cover up and apply an insect repellent containing DEET – and have your dog vaccinated. After hiking, inspect your body for ticks and do the same for your dog.

Agility Training

Agility training is another popular goal-oriented sport. Your dog races through an obstacle course with ladders, hurdles and tunnels, while you run alongside offering praise and encouragement. The fast pace provides both of you with an excellent cardiovascular workout, while your dog also develops improved coordination. Participate in organized competitions or look for a park with an agility course you can use on your own time.

Doga

Downward-dog takes on a whole new spin when you bring your dog to yoga class. “Doga” incorporates your pet into Hatha yoga poses. For example, you recline in resting pose with your legs bent over your terrier’s torso. Classes are springing up across the country, but this is no fat-burner for Fido.

Dog Park

To provide a chance for off-leash play, find a local dog park. Off-leash running and playing lets your dog set his own pace, so he can burn energy and rest when he’s tired. Other perks include the chance to socialize and the mental stimulation that comes with unfettered exploration. Dog owners also get a workout trying to keep up with their pets. It’s a good idea to complete some obedience training before allowing your dog off-leash.